Available courses

Course image Database Administration
School of Computer Science & IT
PREREQUISITE: CIT 3205: ADVANCED DATABASE SYSTEMS\nCourse purpose\nThe purpose of this course is to give the Database Administrator a firm understanding of the components required to successfully deploy an Oracle9i Database on Linux and Windows. Students will learn how to configure the Linux/Windows operating systems for optimal performance within Oracle9i database.
Course image Advanced Database Systems
School of Computer Science & IT

Course Purpose

  1. To evaluate emerging architectures for database management systems
  2. To develop an understanding of the manner in which relational systems are implemented and the implications of the techniques of implementation for database performance
  3. To assess the impact of emerging database standards on the facilities which future database management systems will provide
Course image Principles of Physics
School of Computer Science & IT
COURSE OUTLINE\nName: Principles of Physics\nCourse Code: PHY 1101\nLECTURER: DrD. Elisephane IRANKUNDA\n\nOBJECTIVES:\nAt the end of this course, the student should be able to:\n• Explain the knowledge and skills in Atomic structures\n• Electric charges, charging by induction of and generally electric fields \n• Investigate how capacitors operate\n• Design logic circuits \n• Develop physical intuition\nThe course introduces the electricity and magnetism concepts. This will greatly help the students to understand the architecture and the underlying theory of computer operation.\n\nASSESSMENT:\n• Assignments 15%\n• Continuous Assessment 15%\n• Final Exam 70%\n• Total 100%\n\nREFERENCES:\n1. Fundamentals of Physics ninth edition. Halliday Resnick, John Wiley (2010).ISBN: 9780470469118\n2. Principles of physics(seventh edition), Vern J. Ostdiek, Donald J. Bord(2010) .ISBN: 9780538735391\n3. Sears and Zemansky\'s University Physics: With Modern Physics 12th Edition .Hugh D. Young, Rodger A. Freedman,H. D. Addison-Wesley(2008)ISBN: 9780321501219 \n4. Physics for Scientists and Engineers with Modern Physics (9th Ed)(gnv64)\n\n\n\nWEEK TOPIC CONTENT\n1,2&3 Matter and Atomic Structure • Atomic structure (protons, neutron, electrons),\n• atomic nucleus, \n• atomic number and Atomic mass number, \n• Atomic Ions (positive ion, negative ions) and ionization.\n• Solid, liquid and gas materials and their properties.\n• Example study case of: Neutral lithium atom, Positive lithium ion (Li,+), Negative lithium ion (Li,-), \n• Series of exercises (problems with solutions)\n4,5,6,7&8 Electricity • Coulombs Law, \n• Electric charge; \n• Electrical conductors and insulators; \n• Charging by induction; \n• Coulombs Law. \n• The electric field and electrical forces; \n• Electric field calculations; \n• Gauss’s law; \n• Charges on conductors. \n• Electric potential: \n• Electrical potential energy; potential; \n• The electron volt; \n• Capacitance and dielectrics: \n• Capacitors plate capacitor; \n• the parallel series and parallel; \n• Energy of a charged capacitor effect of a dielectric. Current, \n• Resistance and Electromotive force: \n• Current; \n• Resistance; \n• Electromotive forces- Ohms law; \n• Current-voltage relation; \n• Energy and power in electric circuits. \n• Direct current circuits: \n• Resistors in series and in parallel; \n• Capacitors in series and parallel. \n• Kirchhoff’s rules, \n• Series of exercises (problems with solutions).\nCAT 1\n9,10,11&12 Magnetism • Magnetic fields and magnetic forces: \n• Magnetism; Magnetism field; \n• Magnetic field line, \n• Magnetization. \n• Sources of Magnetic field: \n• Magnetic field of a moving charge; \n• Magnetic field of current element; \n• Magnetic field of a long straight conductor; \n• Magnetic materials. \n• Electromagnetic induction: \n• Induction Phenomena, \n• Series of exercises (problems with solutions)\nCAT 2\n13 CLASS ASSIGNMENTS (TERM PAPER)\n14 EXAMS\n\n\n
Course image Simulation and Modeling
School of Computer Science & IT
SIMULATION MODELING\nLECTURER: Dr.D. Elisephane IRANKUNDA\nASSESSMENT:\n• Attendances 15%\n• Continuous Assessment 15%\n• Final Exam 70%\n• Total 100%\n\nCourse Description\nIntroduction to Modeling and Simulation (IM/S) provides an introduction into modeling and simulation approaches, covering continuum methods (e.g. finite element analysis), atomistic simulation (e.g. molecular dynamics) as well as quantum mechanics. Atomistic and molecular simulation methods are new tools that allow one to predict functional material properties such as Young\'s modulus, strength, thermal properties, color, and others directly from the chemical makeup of the material by solving Schroedinger\'s equation (quantum mechanics). This approach is an exciting new paradigm that allows to design materials and structures from the bottom up — to make materials greener, lighter, stronger, more energy efficient, less expensive; and to produce them from abundant building blocks. These tools play an increasingly important role in modern engineering! In this subject you will get hands-on training in both the fundamentals and applications of these exciting new methods to key engineering problems.\nRecitations\nRecitations will illustrate and/or expand concepts presented in lectures by working through numerical example problems, or by showing how to use the simulation codes. Material covered in recitations is often related to the problem sets and is considered part of the subject content, so regular attendance is advisable.\nHomework\nWe will assign a total of approximately 6 problem sets, focused on simulation work and data analysis. Each problem set is designed to build upon the material covered in the preceding lectures and recitations. The homework assignments will be prepared by teams consisting of three students. In this case, each team will hand in one solution, with the names of team members who contributed as indicated on the cover page. The problem sets worked out by a team of students typically cover more complex problem that require numerical simulation.\nDue dates for problem sets are firm and homework assignments will be corrected and handed back (with solutions) no later than two lectures after the due date. You may use any material to complete the solution. However, it is important that you properly reference the material used (e.g. books, website, journal articles).\nCalendar\nSES # TOPICS KEY DATES\nPart I: Particle and Continuum Methods\n1 Introduction \n2 Basic molecular dynamics HW 1 out\n3 Property calculation I \n4 Property calculation II \n5 How to model chemical interactions I HW 1 due\n6 How to model chemical interactions II HW 2 out\n7 Application to modeling brittle materials \n8 Reactive potentials and applications I \n9 Reactive potentials and applications II HW 2 due\n10 Applications to biophysics and bionanomechanics I \n11 Applications to biophysics and bionanomechanics II HW 3 out\n12 Review session: Preparation for Quiz 1 \nPart II: Quantum Mechanical Methods\n13 It\'s a quantum world: The theory of quantum mechanics \n14 Quantum mechanics (QM): Practice makes perfect \n15 From many-body to single-particle: Quantum modeling of molecules HW 4 out\n16 Application of quantum mechanics to solar thermal fuels \n17 More QM modeling for solar thermal fuels, plus a little H-storage \n18 From atoms to solids HW 4 due\nHW 5 out\n19 Quantum modeling of solids: Basic properties \n20 Advanced properties of materials: What else we can do? \n21 Some review and introduction to solar photovoltaics (PV) HW 5 due\nHW 6 out\n22 Quiz 2 \n23 Solar photovoltaics \n24 A bit more solar PV, some verification and validation and a few concluding thoughts HW 6 due\n\n
Course image Logic Circuit
School of Computer Science & IT
COURSE OUTLINE\nName: Logic Circuit\nCourse Code: PHY 2201 \nLECTURER: DrD. Elisephane IRANKUNDA\nOBJECTIVES:\nAt the end of this course, the student should be able to:\n\n• Understanding logic in circuit design\n• Design and implement combinational circuit \n• Implement practical working examples\nASSESSMENT:\n• Assignments 15%\n• Continuous Assessment 15%\n• Final Exam 70%\n• Total 100%\n\nREFERENCES:\n1. Fundamentals of Physics. 9th ed., David Halliday, Robert Resnick, Jearl Walker, John Wiley & Sons, 2010. ISBN: 9780470469118\n2. G. Boole, An Investigation of the Laws of Thought, 1854, reprinted by Dover Publications, New York, 1954\n3. E. V. Huntington, “Sets of Independent Postulates for the Algebra of Logic,”Transactions of the American Mathematical Society 5 (1904), pp. 288–309.\n4. Introduction to logic circuit, April 5, 1999 14:05 g02-ch2 Sheet number 1 Page number 17 black\n5. A. Dewey, Analysis and Design of Digital Systems with VHDL (PWS Publishing Co.Boston, 1997).\n\n\nWEEK TOPIC CONTENT\n1&2 Mathematical Elements of Logic • Propositional Logic \n• Negation of proposition\n• Implication \n• Disjunctions \n• Equivalence \n• Proposition conjunctions\n• The truth table\n• Normal Form Reduction\n• Propositional Formalization\n3,4,5&6 Logic Circuits • introduction to circuits elements, \n• Variables ( Consepts of switches) ,\n• parallel and series combinations of switches within electrical circuits and Functions (logical OR function and logical AND function) ,\n• Inversion, Truth Tables, transistors, \n• Logic Gates(the elements of logic circuits-AND,OR, NOT NOR,\n• Buffer, XOR,XNOR, and NAND gates and Networks),\n• Analysis of a Logic Network,\n• Timing Diagram, Functionally \n• Equivalent Networks,\n• Boolean Algebra and Axioms of Boolean Algebra, \n• Boolean Single-Variable Theorems,\n• Duality, Two- and Three-Variable Properties, \n• Mapping Boolean expressions to logic gates, \n• a binary full adder , full adder sum and carry out, \n• Mapping truth tale to logic gates,\n• Many possible mapping, optimal gates realization,\nCAT 1\n7 Introduction to Mathematical sets • all sub set of Real numbers, \n• intersections, union, difference of sets and definitions \n• Series of exercises ( solved problems)\n8,9, &10 The Venn Diagram Representation • Constant 1 and constant 0 Venn Diagram Representation, \n• AND and OR Venn Diagram logic function Representation, \n• Proof of: Boolean Algebra;\n• Axioms of Boolean Algebra; \n• Boolean Single-Variable Theorems; \n• Duality, Two- and Three-Variable Properties using Venn Diagram Representation, \n• Notation and Terminology, \n• logical sum and product and Precedence of Operations.\n11&12 Synthesis Using AND, OR, and NOT Gates • logical sum and product,\n• Sum-of-Products \n• Product-of-Sums Forms,\n• Multiplexer Circuit, Three-Way Light Control, \n• Introduction to CAD Tools.\nCAT 2\n13 CLASS ASSIGNMENTS (TERM PAPER)\n14 EXAMS\n\n\n
Course image Database Management Systems
School of Computer Science & IT
Happy New year.\nMy name is Oloo Jacob.\nI will be your Lecturer for this unit. \nIts a practical unit.\n\nKind regards.\n
Course image Application Programming
School of Computer Science & IT
Course Purpose\nThe purpose is to provide students with an understanding of Visual Basic as an Applications programming language.\n\nLearning Outcomes\nBy the completion of course, students should be able to:\n1. Understand and use vb controls\n2. Understand and be able to use the visual basic IDE\n3. Understand vb syntax and semantics\n4. Develop forms applications\n\n\n\nCourse content:\n• Visual basic IDE components\n• Modules\n• Procedures\n• Declaration\n• Variables\n• VB data types\n• VB Controls\n• Control Structures\n• Arrays\n• Functions\n• Files\n\nLearning and Teaching Methodology\nLectures, Tutorials and Lab Sessions\nAssessment\nType Weighting\nExamination 70%\nContinuous Assessment 30%\nTotal 100%\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\nRecommended Text Books\n1. Murach Visual Basic 2015, Author: Anne Boehm,Publisher: Murach\n2. Microsoft Visual Basic 2010 Step by Step,Author: Michael Halvorson,Publisher: Microsoft Press\n3. Simply Visual Basic 2008,Authors: Paul Deitel, H.M Deitel, and G. J. Ayer,Publisher: Prentice Hall
Course image Introduction to Computer Programming
School of Computer Science & IT
Name: Introduction to Computer Programming
Course Code: CIT 1102
Contact Hours: 45 Hrs.
Prerequisites: None
Course Purpose
The aim of this course is to introduce you to computer programming. Computer programming is the process of formulating the problems in such a way that they can be solved using computers. This involves formulating the solution to the problem in the form of a sequence of simple operations, called an algorithm. The aim of the course is to teach you how to develop algorithms to solve a range of different problems, which you will later translate into C++ Programs.
Learning Outcomes
By the end of this course, students will be able to:-
1. Outline and analyze the strategies and methods of problem solving.
2. Apply the methods of structured program design.
3. Compare the basic facilities of a program development environment
4. Infer programs using simple data types, basic control structures including sequencing, selection, iteration, and functions.
Course Content
Structured programming: problem solving techniques; Algorithms; Pseudo code; Syntax, and Semantics, and looping control constructs; Functional and procedural abstractions Data abstraction.
Learning and Teaching Methodology
Lectures, Tutorials and Practical lab sessions
Instructional materials/Equipment
Audi Visual equipment, chalkboard, computer simulation software , programming language tools

Assessment
Type Weighting
Examination 70%
Continuous Assessment 30%
Total 100%

Recommended Text Books
1. Programming and Problem Solving with C++, Nell Dale, Chip Weens and Mark Headington, Jones and Barlett Publishing 2002.ISBN 0-7637-0798-8
Course image Object Oriented Programming II (Java Programming)
School of Computer Science & IT
Names: Java Programming\nCourse code: CIT 2101\nContact Hours: 45 Hours\nCourse Purpose\nThis course emphasizes program construction, algorithm development, coding, debugging and documentation of console and graphical user applications. It further imparts in application of advanced object oriented techniques to application development using java. Course content emphasizes database connectivity, inner classes, collection classes, networking and threads\nLearning outcomes\n1. By the end of this course, students should be able to:\n2. Apply stand –alone applications using the java language.\n3. Accurately implement Object-Oriented concepts using java features, such as classes, interfaces, and references.\n4. Develop well-scoped classes using package and inner classes.\n5. Implement the java 2 Collections Framework to work with groups of objects, the java .awt and javax,swing packages to create GUI application\n6. Implement threads to improve performance of java programs\n\n\nCourse Content\nIntensive and hands- on, the course emphasizes becoming productive quickly as java application developer. This course quickly covers he java 5.0 language syntax and then moves into the object-oriented features of the language. Students will then use several of the provided API packages, such as I/O streams, collection, Swing GUI programming, threads and accessing a database with JDBC.The course ends with a chapter on performance tuning with hints and best practices for writing efficient applications. Appendices on sockets, regular expressions and J2EE are also available for further study.\nLearning and Teaching Methodology\nLectures, Tutorials and Lab Sessions\nAssessment\nType Weighting\nExamination 70%\nContinuous Assessment 30%\nTotal 100%\n\nRecommended Text Books\n1. Introduction to Programming in Java. Sedge wick and Wayne, Addison Wesley (20007), ISBN:978-0321498052.\n2. Java For Dummies, 4th Edition, Barry Burd (2006),ISBN:0470087161,978-470087169\n3. Sam’s Teach Yourself Programming with Java in 24 hours, 4th Edition, Rogers Cadenhead, Sams(2010),ISBN:0672328445,978-672328442\n4. Head First Java, 2nd Edition, Kathy Sierra and Bert Bates, O’Reilly Media, Inc. (2009). ISBN:0596009208,978-059600920
Course image Bachelors of Business Information Technology
School of Computer Science & IT

Our Bachelor of Business Information Technology program is your key to mastering the intersection of business and technology. With relevant courses and industry-savvy faculty, this program equips students with the skills needed for success in the dynamic world of IT and business. Join us for a journey into the heart of business technology innovation.

Course image Bachelors of Computer Science & Information Technology
School of Computer Science & IT

Our Bachelor of Computer Science & Information Technology program provides the gateway to a world of technological innovation. With cutting-edge courses and industry-experienced faculty, this program equips students with the skills and knowledge to excel in the digital age. Join us for a journey into the heart of computer science and IT expertise.

Course image Fundamentals of Computer Science and its Applications
School of Computer Science & IT

This course is designed to develop students’ computer literacy, keyboarding skills and to meet the needs of students in the associate degree programs and technical certificate programs. The student will learn from hands-on experiences basic skills in file management utilities, word processing, spreadsheets, and graphical presentations in the Windows environment.

Course image Business Management (BBM) Option - Human Resource
School of Computer Science & IT

Our Business Management (BBM) program offers a specialized track in Human Resource, empowering students with the knowledge and skills to excel in managing and nurturing talent within organizations. Join us to embark on a journey to become a human resource professional.

Course image Business Management (BBM) Option - Sales & Marketing
School of Computer Science & IT

Our Business Management (BBM) program offers a specialized track in Sales & Marketing, preparing students for dynamic and rewarding careers in the world of sales and marketing. Join us to become a future sales and marketing leader.

Course image Business Management (BBM) Options - Accounting, Banking, and Finance
School of Computer Science & IT

Our Business Management (BBM) program offers specialized tracks in Accounting, Banking, and Finance. These options provide students with focused knowledge and skills in these vital areas of business. Join us to chart your path to a successful career in finance and financial management.

Course image Fundamentals of Computer Science and its Applications
School of Computer Science & IT

This course is designed to develop students’ computer literacy, keyboarding skills and to meet the needs of students in the associate degree programs and technical certificate programs. The student will learn from hands-on experiences basic skills in file management utilities, word processing, spreadsheets, and graphical presentations in the Windows environment.

Course image Human Growth and Development
School of Education
Human growth and development is the study of human beings from conception to death.it provides an essential background to various disciplines such as health, social welfare and education. The main purpose is to help students understand the biological, social, culture and ecological development process of human beings.
Course image E-Commerce
School of Education
Welcome to Distance learning mode of study do all assignments on Time to avoid missing marks
Course image Principles of Marketing
School of Education
Welcome to Distance learning mode of study do all assignments on Time to avoid missing marks
Course image Financial Management
School of Education
Course Title : Financial management\nCourse Code : FNB 2201\nContact Hours : 60Hrs. Credits: 4\nLevel : Year 2 Semester 2\nPrerequisites : Principles of Accounting 1, Business Mathematics\n\nCourse Purpose\nThe course prepares students on how to manage risk with derivate and how to make sound decision based on data analysis collected from the market. Also to enable the student in applying financial principles in order to make sound financial decisions. This will be achieved by zooming in into the objectives of financial management, capital budgeting, the impact of taxation on capital budgeting. Sources and procurement of long term and short-term finance with special reference to Kenya Cost of capital, working capital management, Stock exchange practice, dividend policy; valuation of assets. \nLearning Outcomes\nBy the end of the course, students would be able to:-\na) Estimate the present value of the anticipated cash flows on an investment.\nb) Calculate the value and yield on bonds and stocks.\nc) Calculate and interpret the NPV and IRR of a capital investment.\nd) Estimate the cash flows needed to find a capital investments NPV and IRR.\ne) Calculate and estimate cost of capital the weighted average cost of capital for a firm.\nf) Adjust a firms cost of capital for risk to find a capital investment.\ng) Evaluate the risk/return effects of different financial structures for a firm’s working capital.\n\nCourse Content \nFinancial management: Introduction to finance, objectives of financial management – profit maximization and wealth maximization; Relationship between business and financial planning, Goals of the firm, agency theory, Tools of business finance; Changing role of finance managers. Organization of finance function. Time value of money: Time Lines & notation, Future value of single cash flow & annuity, present value of single cash flow, annuity& perpetuity. Risk and Return – Risk & return of single asset, portfolio, Measurement of market risk. Introduction to Sources of Business funds: External sources: Equity and Loan capital, hire purchase, Lease and Trade credit; Internal sources: Retained earnings, Provisions and reserves; Sources of funds for Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs), Capital markets. Cost of capital – basic concepts. Cost of debenture capital, cost of preferential capital, cost of term loans, cost of equity capital (Dividend discounting and CAPM Model). Cost of retained earnings. Determination of Weighted average cost of capital (WACC) and Marginal cost of capital. Investment decisions: Investment evaluation techniques – Net present value, Internal rate of return, Modified internal rate of return, Profitability index, Payback period, discounted pay back period, accounting rate of return. Estimation of cash flow for new project, replacement projects. Working capital management: factors influencing working capital requirements. Current asset policy and current asset finance policy. Determination of operating cycle and cash cycle. Estimation of working capital requirements of a firm. Capital structure decisions – Planning the capital structure. Leverages – Determination of operating leverage, financial leverage and total leverage. Dividend policy – Factors affecting the dividend policy - dividend policies- stable dividend, stable payout. Measuring Business Performance: Financial Ratio analysis: Profitability ratios, Solvency and Liquidity ratios, Activity ratios, Market ratios; Vertical and Horizontal analysis\n\nLearning and Teaching Methodology \nAssessment Strategy \nPractical skills via work related assignments through mentors, supervised exercises, prescribes readings, self-directed study, writing and presentation, oral presentation of reports and self-assessment by the learner in regards to expected work requirements. Mentorship and protégé relationships in various stages as assigned by the organization.\n• Regular attendance verification\n• Students will be provided with tasks, assignments and exercises\n• individual/ group presentations and \n• final end-of-semester examinations\n\nAssessment Pattern\nComponent Weighting (%) Learning objectives covered\nIn-course assessment: \nIndividual Assignments 10 (a) (b)\nGroup Assignment, Presentations and Practical classes 10 (a) (b) \nOne Invigilated CAT 10 (b), (c) \nFinal Exams: 70 (a), (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) (g) \n \nTOTAL 100 \nStrategy for feedback and student support \n\nThe opportunity for feedback will be provided through the student- centred learning. Students will also be given a chance to evaluate learning by filling evaluation forms. Assignments/ exercises/ CATS will be marked so as to provide learners with feedback before the end of Semester Examination. Remedial work will also be done. The lecturers will be available for consultation/ advice to clarify language issues raised during lectures and group discussions.\n\nRecommended Text Books \n Title Author Year of Publication Publisher\n1 Financial management Edition: 9th ed Pandey ,I M. 2005 New Delhi : Vikas\n2\n Principles of Managerial Finance Gitman J L 2006 Pearson Education Inc.\n3 Managerial Finance 8th Edition Weston and Copeland 2004 Dryden Press\n\nRecommended Text Books for Further Reading\n Title Author Year of Publication Publisher\n1.\n Principles of Corporate Finance, 4thEdition Brealey and Myers 2005 McGraw Hill\n2.\n\n\n\n Fundamental of Corporate Finance, 10th Edition Stephen A. Ross, Randolph W. Westrfield andBradford D Jordan 1995 Pitman\n3.\n Fundamental of Financial Management James Van Horne 1982 Pitman\n4.\n\n Financial Management: Theory andPractice, 8th Edition Eugene F. Brigham and Louise Gapenski 197 Prentice Hall International Edition\n
Course image Principles of Accounting I
School of Education
Course Title : PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING 1\nCourse Code : ACC 1204\nContact Hours : 60 hours Credit: 4\nLevel : Year 1 Semester 2 \nPrerequisites : None\nCourse Purpose \nThe course is intended to introduce students to the financial accounting principles which are the core units in the BBM degree course by zooming into the nature, purpose, and scope of accounting. Accounting circles, financial statements, recording of business transactions. Objectives of business; forms of business organizations; purposes of accounting and accounting information; users of accounting information; accounting policies, regulations; double entry accounting; cash book and ledgers; petty cash book and the ledgers; and subsidiary books of accounts; writing up cash book; bank reconciliation; writing up complete books of accounts and the trial balance; book-keeping errors and the trial balance.\nLearning Outcomes \nBy the end of the course, the students should be able to:-\na) Record incomes and expenditure\nb) Prepare cash book, petty cash book, journal, ledger and trial balances.\nc) Collect and analyze information for the purpose of preparing final accounts\nd) Prepare state of affairs and income statements\n\nCourse Content\nIntroduction to Accounting: Definitions; accounting and book keeping, business transactions, Accounting cycle, Balance sheet equation, Users of accounting information, Objectives of accounting, Accounting principles, concepts, assumptions, Desirable characteristics of accounting statements, Limitations of accounting records, Conceptual framework of financial reporting. The Ledger and the Concept of Double Entry: The Journal, Source documents, The Ledger, Classification of accounts and double entry, Posting of transactions in the books, balancing off accounts, The Trial Balance. Final Accounts: Basic financial statements, Income Statement, Balance Sheet. Adjustments in the final accounts: Depreciation of fixed assets, Accruals, Prepayments, Bad debts, provision for bad debts. Cash book: Two column cash book, Three column cash book, Analytical cash book, Petty cash and the imprest system. Bank reconciliation: Purpose of bank reconciliation, Causes of difference between cashbook and bank statement balance, Adjusted cash book, Bank reconciliation statement. Correction of Accounting Errors: Errors affecting the trial balance, Errors not affecting the trial balance (Suspense Account).\n\nLearning and Teaching Methodology \nAssessment Strategy \nPractical skills via work related assignments through mentors, supervised exercises, prescribes readings, self-directed study, writing and presentation, oral presentation of reports and self-assessment by the learner in regards to expected work requirements. Mentorship and protégé relationships in various stages as assigned by the organization.\n\n• Regular attendance verification\n• Students will be provided with tasks, assignments and exercises\n• individual/ group presentations and \n• final end-of-semester examinations\nAssessment Pattern\n\nComponent Weighting (%) Learning objectives covered\nIn-course assessment: \nIndividual Assignments 10 (a) (b)\nGroup Assignment, Presentations and Practical classes 10 (a) (b) \nOne Invigilated CAT 10 (b), (c) \nFinal Exams: 70 (a), (b) (c) (d)\n \nTOTAL 100 \nStrategy for feedback and student support \n\nThe opportunity for feedback will be provided through the student- centred learning. Students will also be given a chance to evaluate learning by filling evaluation forms. Assignments/ exercises/ CATS will be marked so as to provide learners with feedback before the end of Semester Examination. Remedial work will also be done. The lecturers will be available for consultation/ advice to clarify language issues raised during lectures and group discussions.\n\nRecommended Books\n Title Author Year of Publication Publisher\n1. Accounting 1: An Introduction Alex Watson; T. Walker; J Kew; Carmen Mettler 2007 Oxford University\nPress Southern Africa\n2. Business Accounting Frank Wood 2002 Pitman Publishing\n3. An Introduction to Accountancy 3rd Edition Mahesh war, SN 2006 Vikas Publishing\n4 Fundamentals of Accounting. Wang’ombe, K. D. 2008 Nairobi: Focus Publishers\n5 Introduction to Book Keeping and Accounting Simplified Saleemi, N.A. 2010 Nairobi: Saleemi Publications Ltd\n\n\nRecommended Text Books for Further Reading \n Title Author Year of Publication Publisher\n1. A new Introduction to financial accounting , International Edition Meigs, Robert et al 2000 Prentice Hall\n2. A complete System of Practical Book-Keeping Favell A.J 2008 Biblio Bazaar, LLC\n
Course image Principles of Accounting II
School of Education
Course Title : PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING 2\nCorse Code : ACC 2104\nContact Hours : 60Hrs Credit: 4 \nLevel : Year 2 Semester 1\nPrerequisites Principles of Accounting 1\n\nCourse Purpose \nThe course is intended to build up concepts acquired in Financial Accounting II by introducing the students to reporting branch accounting and depreciation. Accounting for nonprofit organizations; Cash flow statements ; Introduction to incomplete records. Accounting for non-profit making firms\nLearning Outcomes \nBy the end of the session, students should be able to:-\na) Apply accounting principles in preparing financial statements \nb) Prepare financial statements of various entities.\n\nIndicative Content\nAccounting for fixed assets: Classification of fixed assets as tangible and intangible, Additional Methods of computing depreciation, Double entry accounting for depreciation, Writing up fixed assets ledger accounts, Accounting for disposal of fixed assets. Manufacturing accounts: Introduction and objectives of manufacturing firms, Analysis of the basic elements of costs and costs classification, Preparation of manufacturing accounts, Adjustments for unrealized stock profits, Preparation of final accounts and balance sheet for a manufacturing firm. Control accounts: Purpose and types of control accounts, Sources of information for writing up control accounts, Types of control accounts, Items not used in writing up control accounts, Treatments of “contras” in control accounts. Incomplete records: Nature and types of financial records made under single entry accounting, Computation of profits under incomplete records, Net worth method, preparing statement of affairs, preparing a statement of profit and loss, using mark-up and margin rates to estimate profits, sales and cost of goods sold, Double entry method, writing cash book summary, writing debtor and creditors control accounts, Preparing normal final accounts. Accounts for non-profit making organizations (clubs and societies): Nature and forms of no-profit making organizations, Types of records maintained by clubs and societies, Preparing a statement of income and expenditure to estimate profits generated by non-profit making organizations. Statement of Cash flows: Direct and indirect methods, Cash flow from Operating activities; Investing activities; Financing activities.\n\n\nLearning and Teaching Methodology \nAssessment Strategy \nPractical skills via work related assignments through mentors, supervised exercises, prescribes readings, self-directed study, writing and presentation, oral presentation of reports and self-assessment by the learner in regards to expected work requirements. Mentorship and protégé relationships in various stages as assigned by the organization.\n• Regular attendance verification\n• Students will be provided with tasks, assignments and exercises\n• individual/ group presentations and \n• final end-of-semester examinations\n\nAssessment Pattern\nComponent Weighting (%) Learning objectives covered\nIn-course assessment: \nIndividual Assignments 10 (a) (b)\nGroup Assignment, Presentations and Practical classes 10 (a) (b) \nOne Invigilated CAT 10 (a), (b) \nFinal Exams: 70 (a), (b) \n \nTOTAL 100 \nStrategy for feedback and student support \nThe opportunity for feedback will be provided through the student- centred learning. Students will also be given a chance to evaluate learning by filling evaluation forms. Assignments/ exercises/ CATS will be marked so as to provide learners with feedback before the end of Semester Examination. Remedial work will also be done. The lecturers will be available for consultation/ advice to clarify language issues raised during lectures and group discussions.\n\nRecommended Text Books \n Title Author Year of Publication Publisher\n1.\n\n\n2.\n\n Business Accounting \n\n\nIntermediate Accounting Frank Hood \n\n\nJan Williams etal 2006\n\n\n2001 Pitman\n\n\nHarcomt , Bruce Jovarich\n3 Fundamentals of accounting\nEdition: 2nd ed Wang\'ome, David K.\n 2008 Publisher: Nairobi: Focus\n4 Essentials of financial accounting\nEdition: 2nd ed Bhattacharyya, Asish; 2014 Publisher: New Delhi : PHI Learning\n5 Fundamental financial accounting concepts\nEdition: 8th ed Edmonds, Thomas P; McNair, Frances M; Olds, Philip R.\n 2013 Publisher: New York, NY : McGraw-Hill/Irwin\n\nRecommended Text Books for Further Reading\n Title Author Year of Publication Publisher \n1.\n The Financial Accounting 1 Made Easy Ashiq Hussain 203 EAP\n
Course image Introduction to Communication Skills
School of Education
communication skills is important and all students must take this unit. it helps students to learn what communication is, importance of communication , how write, speak . it helps students to write other subjects or unit
Course image Entrepreneurship Skills
School of Education
This is unit helps students to acquire the skills that help them to create their own business entities \nevery student must have the skills that help them to be independence and not to rely on employment
Course image Project Management
School of Education
Project Management module is intended to help students understand the nature of Projects and the technicalities involved in handling projects and managing the various phases of the project life cycle. The module explores the project management functions that are carried out at the different stages of a project’s life cycle and the analytical tools applied thereof.
Course image Business Ethics and Corporate Governance
School of Business Management
The course aims to introduce students to an ethics-based value system in business and organizations. Students become more effective decision makers by examining the meaning and role of ethics in the business environment, and the social responsibility of business organizations.

Site announcements

There are no discussion topics yet in this forum