Available courses

Course image Introduction to Computer Programming
School of Computer Science & IT
Name: Introduction to Computer Programming\nCourse Code: CIT 1102\nContact Hours: 45 Hrs.\nPrerequisites: None\nCourse Purpose\nThe aim of this course is to introduce you to computer programming. Computer programming is the process of formulating the problems in such a way that they can be solved using computers. This involves formulating the solution to the problem in the form of a sequence of simple operations, called an algorithm. The aim of the course is to teach you how to develop algorithms to solve a range of different problems, which you will later translate into C++ Programs.\nLearning Outcomes\nBy the end of this course, students will be able to:-\n1. Outline and analyze the strategies and methods of problem solving.\n2. Apply the methods of structured program design.\n3. Compare the basic facilities of a program development environment\n4. Infer programs using simple data types, basic control structures including sequencing, selection, iteration, and functions.\nCourse Content\nStructured programming: problem solving techniques; Algorithms; Pseudo code; Syntax, and Semantics, and looping control constructs; Functional and procedural abstractions Data abstraction.\nLearning and Teaching Methodology\nLectures, Tutorials and Practical lab sessions\nInstructional materials/Equipment\nAudi Visual equipment, chalkboard, computer simulation software , programming language tools\n\nAssessment\nType Weighting\nExamination 70%\nContinuous Assessment 30%\nTotal 100%\n\nRecommended Text Books\n1. Programming and Problem Solving with C++, Nell Dale, Chip Weens and Mark Headington, Jones and Barlett Publishing 2002.ISBN 0-7637-0798-8
Course image Data Structures and Algorithms
School of Computer Science & IT
The purpose of the course is to introduce to the student the state to the art in programming using high-level languages. Programming skill is an essential tool for Computer Science Student. The course will be useful for other subsequent courses such as Data Structures and Algorithms, programming II and any other course requiring the skills of programming.\n\n\n\n
Course image Digital System Components and Design Techniques
School of Computer Science & IT
Course Unit Description: Course Unit Description: Course Purpose To design digital system using Large scale integration (LSI) and Medium Scale integration (MSI) components, practical of circuits in laboratory environment including implementation of small digital system such as a arithmetic modules, displays and timers. Learning Outcomes By the end of this course, students should be able to: Analysis of digital integrated circuits Implementation of a digital Integrated circuits (ICS) Course Content Introduction; Manufacturing process; Digital device; Complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) inverter, Combinational circuits; Sequential circuits; Implementation of digital ICS Coping with interconnect; Timing issues; Arithmetic building blocks. Recommended Text Books Design of Analog CMOS Integrated circuit. Behzad Razavi. McGraw-Hill,2010. ISBN:9787302108863 Analysis of Design of Integrated Circuits,4/e, Paul R. Wiley (2008): ISBN:9788126515691 Recommended Text Books for Further Reading CMOS VLSI DESIGN: A circuits and systems perspective,3/e. Neil H.E. Western. Pearson Education (2010).ISBN: 9788177585681
Course image Computational skill
School of Computer Science & IT
COURSE OUTLINE\n UNIT TITLE : COMPUTATIONAL SKILLS\nCOURSE CODE: UCC122\n \nLECTURER: Dr. Elisephane IRANKUNDA\nOBJECTIVES:\nAt the end of this course, the student should be able to:\n• Apply mathematical concepts in their day to day life.\n• Demonstrate ability to use the computer in their programme.\n• Describe briefly-and-precisely the basic mathematical concepts covered in this course, such as set theory functions and inequalities and simulations\nASSESSMENT:\n• Assignments 15%\n• Continuous Assessment 15%\n• Final Exam 70%\n• Total 100%\n\nREFERENCES:\n1. Discrete Mathematics and its Applications, 4th edition; Leonard F.R Rosen; 2007; Sinag tala\n2. Sarkar, Swapan Kumar (2003) A textbook of discrete mathematics. New Delhi: S.Chand & Company.\n\n\nWEEK TOPIC CONTENT\n1,2,3&4 Algebra • Numbers and operations \n• Set of real numbers\n• Properties of real numbers\n• Absolute value equations\n• Powers\n• Radicals\n• Indices and surds\n• Exponential and logarithmic functions,\n• Equations and inequalities and their graphical representations\n• Linear and Quadratic equations and inequalities and graphics\n• Solving systems of linear equations.\n5,6,7&8 Set theory • sets elements,\n• Venn diagrams, \n• operations on set, \n• set enumeration.\nCAT 1\n9,10,11&12 Functions • Functions \n• inequalities, \n• liner functions, \n• quadratic equations, \n• polynomials higher order equations, \n• exponential functions \n• logarithmic functions. \n• Simultaneous equations\nCAT 2\n13 CLASS ASSIGNMENTS (TERM PAPER)\n14 EXAMS\n\n\n
Course image Principles of Physics
School of Computer Science & IT
COURSE OUTLINE\nName: Principles of Physics\nCourse Code: PHY 1101\nLECTURER: Dr. Elisephane IRANKUNDA\n\nOBJECTIVES:\nAt the end of this course, the student should be able to:\n• Explain the knowledge and skills in Atomic structures\n• Electric charges, charging by induction of and generally electric fields \n• Investigate how capacitors operate\n• Design logic circuits \n• Develop physical intuition\nThe course introduces the electricity and magnetism concepts. This will greatly help the students to understand the architecture and the underlying theory of computer operation.\n\nASSESSMENT:\n• Assignments 15%\n• Continuous Assessment 15%\n• Final Exam 70%\n• Total 100%\n\nREFERENCES:\n1. Fundamentals of Physics ninth edition. Halliday Resnick, John Wiley (2010).ISBN: 9780470469118\n2. Principles of physics(seventh edition), Vern J. Ostdiek, Donald J. Bord(2010) .ISBN: 9780538735391\n3. Sears and Zemansky\'s University Physics: With Modern Physics 12th Edition .Hugh D. Young, Rodger A. Freedman,H. D. Addison-Wesley(2008)ISBN: 9780321501219 \n4. Physics for Scientists and Engineers with Modern Physics (9th Ed)(gnv64)\n\n\n\nWEEK TOPIC CONTENT\n1,2&3 Matter and Atomic Structure • Atomic structure (protons, neutron, electrons),\n• atomic nucleus, \n• atomic number and Atomic mass number, \n• Atomic Ions (positive ion, negative ions) and ionization.\n• Solid, liquid and gas materials and their properties.\n• Example study case of: Neutral lithium atom, Positive lithium ion (Li,+), Negative lithium ion (Li,-), \n• Series of exercises (problems with solutions)\n4,5,6,7&8 Electricity • Coulombs Law, \n• Electric charge; \n• Electrical conductors and insulators; \n• Charging by induction; \n• Coulombs Law. \n• The electric field and electrical forces; \n• Electric field calculations; \n• Gauss’s law; \n• Charges on conductors. \n• Electric potential: \n• Electrical potential energy; potential; \n• The electron volt; \n• Capacitance and dielectrics: \n• Capacitors plate capacitor; \n• the parallel series and parallel; \n• Energy of a charged capacitor effect of a dielectric. Current, \n• Resistance and Electromotive force: \n• Current; \n• Resistance; \n• Electromotive forces- Ohms law; \n• Current-voltage relation; \n• Energy and power in electric circuits. \n• Direct current circuits: \n• Resistors in series and in parallel; \n• Capacitors in series and parallel. \n• Kirchhoff’s rules, \n• Series of exercises (problems with solutions).\nCAT 1\n9,10,11&12 Magnetism • Magnetic fields and magnetic forces: \n• Magnetism; Magnetism field; \n• Magnetic field line, \n• Magnetization. \n• Sources of Magnetic field: \n• Magnetic field of a moving charge; \n• Magnetic field of current element; \n• Magnetic field of a long straight conductor; \n• Magnetic materials. \n• Electromagnetic induction: \n• Induction Phenomena, \n• Series of exercises (problems with solutions)\nCAT 2\n13 CLASS ASSIGNMENTS (TERM PAPER)\n14 EXAMS\n\n\n
Course image Basic Circuit Design
School of Computer Science & IT
COURSE OUTLINE\nName: Basic Circuit Design\nCourse Code: PHY 2101\nLECTURER: Elisephane IRANKUNDA\nOBJECTIVES:\nBy the end of this course, students will be able to:-\n1. Design a logic circuits\n2. Evaluate simplification using Karnaugh maps\n3. Designing and implementing combinational circuits, Sequential circuits\nASSESSMENT:\n• Assignments 15%\n• Continuous Assessment 15%\n• Final Exam 70%\n• Total 100%\n\nREFERENCES:\n1. Physics 3rd Edition. Halliday , Resnick, John Wiley(1999), ISBN: 471320579\n\nRecommended Text Books for Further Reading\n2. Principles of physics (Third Edition). Frank J. Blatt, Allyn and Bacon(20088). ISBN: 0-205-11784-8\n3. University Physics(7th Edition).Sera, F.W. Zemansky, M. W. Yound, H. D. Addison-Wesley(2010).ISBN: 0131495798\n\n\nWEEK TOPIC CONTENT\n1&2 An introduction to logic circuits, the elements of logic circuits • AND Gates\n• OR Gates\n• NOT Gates\n• NOR Gates\n• NAND Gates\n• Buffer Gates\n• XOR Gates\n• XNORGates \n• Networks\n3,4,5&6 Logic functions and truth tables; the application of Boolean algebra theorems; Simplification using Karnaugh maps • introduction to circuits elements, \n• Variables ( Consepts of switches) ,\n• parallel and series combinations of switches within electrical circuits and Functions (logical OR function and logical AND function) ,\n• Inversion, Truth Tables, transistors, \n• Logic Gates(the elements of logic circuits-AND,OR, NOT NOR,\n• Buffer, XOR,XNOR, and NAND gates and Networks),\n• Analysis of a Logic Network,\n• Timing Diagram, Functionally \n• Equivalent Networks,\n• Boolean Algebra and Axioms of Boolean Algebra, \n• Boolean Single-Variable Theorems,\n• Duality, Two- and Three-Variable Properties, \n• Mapping Boolean expressions to logic gates, \n• a binary full adder , full adder sum and carry out, \n• Mapping truth tale to logic gates,\n• Many possible mapping, optimal gates realization,\nCAT 1\n \n7,8 &9 Elements of electronic and circuit analysis design • Electronic realization of logic values and gates\n• practical design and implementation of combinational circuits using selected standard integrated circuits\n• Logic families,\n• open collector \n• and tri-state gates \n• and their applications; \n• Information storage \n• and transfer,\n• registers, \n• flip flops\n• An introduction to sequential circuits and finite state machines\n• Elements of sequential circuits and their electronic realization.\n10, 11&12 SEMICONDUCTOR\nELECTRONICS:\nMATERIALS, DEVICES\nAND SIMPLE CIRCUITS • Conductors , insulators and semi coductors\n• N, P types semi conductor \n• Diodes and circuit applications \n• Transistors and circuit applications \n• Half and full wave rectifier circuit \n• Generalized circuit analysis with circuit theorems\nCAT 2\n13 CLASS ASSIGNMENTS (TERM PAPER)\n14 EXAMS\n\n\n
Course image Database Management Systems
School of Computer Science & IT
Dear students.\nMy name is Oloo Jacob. \nWelcome to this Unit. I will be your lecturer for this unit.\n\nThank you
Course image Internet Programming and Web Design
School of Computer Science & IT
Dear students.\nMy name is Oloo Jacob. \nWelcome to this Unit. I will be your lecturer for this unit.\n\nThank you
Course image Object Oriented programming I (C++)
School of Computer Science & IT
Dear students.\nMy name is Oloo Jacob. \nWelcome to this Unit. I will be your lecturer for this unit.\n\nThank you
Course image Database Administration
School of Computer Science & IT
PREREQUISITE: CIT 3205: ADVANCED DATABASE SYSTEMS\nCourse purpose\nThe purpose of this course is to give the Database Administrator a firm understanding of the components required to successfully deploy an Oracle9i Database on Linux and Windows. Students will learn how to configure the Linux/Windows operating systems for optimal performance within Oracle9i database.
Course image Advanced Database Systems
School of Computer Science & IT

Course Purpose

  1. To evaluate emerging architectures for database management systems
  2. To develop an understanding of the manner in which relational systems are implemented and the implications of the techniques of implementation for database performance
  3. To assess the impact of emerging database standards on the facilities which future database management systems will provide
Course image Principles of Physics
School of Computer Science & IT
COURSE OUTLINE\nName: Principles of Physics\nCourse Code: PHY 1101\nLECTURER: DrD. Elisephane IRANKUNDA\n\nOBJECTIVES:\nAt the end of this course, the student should be able to:\n• Explain the knowledge and skills in Atomic structures\n• Electric charges, charging by induction of and generally electric fields \n• Investigate how capacitors operate\n• Design logic circuits \n• Develop physical intuition\nThe course introduces the electricity and magnetism concepts. This will greatly help the students to understand the architecture and the underlying theory of computer operation.\n\nASSESSMENT:\n• Assignments 15%\n• Continuous Assessment 15%\n• Final Exam 70%\n• Total 100%\n\nREFERENCES:\n1. Fundamentals of Physics ninth edition. Halliday Resnick, John Wiley (2010).ISBN: 9780470469118\n2. Principles of physics(seventh edition), Vern J. Ostdiek, Donald J. Bord(2010) .ISBN: 9780538735391\n3. Sears and Zemansky\'s University Physics: With Modern Physics 12th Edition .Hugh D. Young, Rodger A. Freedman,H. D. Addison-Wesley(2008)ISBN: 9780321501219 \n4. Physics for Scientists and Engineers with Modern Physics (9th Ed)(gnv64)\n\n\n\nWEEK TOPIC CONTENT\n1,2&3 Matter and Atomic Structure • Atomic structure (protons, neutron, electrons),\n• atomic nucleus, \n• atomic number and Atomic mass number, \n• Atomic Ions (positive ion, negative ions) and ionization.\n• Solid, liquid and gas materials and their properties.\n• Example study case of: Neutral lithium atom, Positive lithium ion (Li,+), Negative lithium ion (Li,-), \n• Series of exercises (problems with solutions)\n4,5,6,7&8 Electricity • Coulombs Law, \n• Electric charge; \n• Electrical conductors and insulators; \n• Charging by induction; \n• Coulombs Law. \n• The electric field and electrical forces; \n• Electric field calculations; \n• Gauss’s law; \n• Charges on conductors. \n• Electric potential: \n• Electrical potential energy; potential; \n• The electron volt; \n• Capacitance and dielectrics: \n• Capacitors plate capacitor; \n• the parallel series and parallel; \n• Energy of a charged capacitor effect of a dielectric. Current, \n• Resistance and Electromotive force: \n• Current; \n• Resistance; \n• Electromotive forces- Ohms law; \n• Current-voltage relation; \n• Energy and power in electric circuits. \n• Direct current circuits: \n• Resistors in series and in parallel; \n• Capacitors in series and parallel. \n• Kirchhoff’s rules, \n• Series of exercises (problems with solutions).\nCAT 1\n9,10,11&12 Magnetism • Magnetic fields and magnetic forces: \n• Magnetism; Magnetism field; \n• Magnetic field line, \n• Magnetization. \n• Sources of Magnetic field: \n• Magnetic field of a moving charge; \n• Magnetic field of current element; \n• Magnetic field of a long straight conductor; \n• Magnetic materials. \n• Electromagnetic induction: \n• Induction Phenomena, \n• Series of exercises (problems with solutions)\nCAT 2\n13 CLASS ASSIGNMENTS (TERM PAPER)\n14 EXAMS\n\n\n
Course image Simulation and Modeling
School of Computer Science & IT
SIMULATION MODELING\nLECTURER: Dr.D. Elisephane IRANKUNDA\nASSESSMENT:\n• Attendances 15%\n• Continuous Assessment 15%\n• Final Exam 70%\n• Total 100%\n\nCourse Description\nIntroduction to Modeling and Simulation (IM/S) provides an introduction into modeling and simulation approaches, covering continuum methods (e.g. finite element analysis), atomistic simulation (e.g. molecular dynamics) as well as quantum mechanics. Atomistic and molecular simulation methods are new tools that allow one to predict functional material properties such as Young\'s modulus, strength, thermal properties, color, and others directly from the chemical makeup of the material by solving Schroedinger\'s equation (quantum mechanics). This approach is an exciting new paradigm that allows to design materials and structures from the bottom up — to make materials greener, lighter, stronger, more energy efficient, less expensive; and to produce them from abundant building blocks. These tools play an increasingly important role in modern engineering! In this subject you will get hands-on training in both the fundamentals and applications of these exciting new methods to key engineering problems.\nRecitations\nRecitations will illustrate and/or expand concepts presented in lectures by working through numerical example problems, or by showing how to use the simulation codes. Material covered in recitations is often related to the problem sets and is considered part of the subject content, so regular attendance is advisable.\nHomework\nWe will assign a total of approximately 6 problem sets, focused on simulation work and data analysis. Each problem set is designed to build upon the material covered in the preceding lectures and recitations. The homework assignments will be prepared by teams consisting of three students. In this case, each team will hand in one solution, with the names of team members who contributed as indicated on the cover page. The problem sets worked out by a team of students typically cover more complex problem that require numerical simulation.\nDue dates for problem sets are firm and homework assignments will be corrected and handed back (with solutions) no later than two lectures after the due date. You may use any material to complete the solution. However, it is important that you properly reference the material used (e.g. books, website, journal articles).\nCalendar\nSES # TOPICS KEY DATES\nPart I: Particle and Continuum Methods\n1 Introduction \n2 Basic molecular dynamics HW 1 out\n3 Property calculation I \n4 Property calculation II \n5 How to model chemical interactions I HW 1 due\n6 How to model chemical interactions II HW 2 out\n7 Application to modeling brittle materials \n8 Reactive potentials and applications I \n9 Reactive potentials and applications II HW 2 due\n10 Applications to biophysics and bionanomechanics I \n11 Applications to biophysics and bionanomechanics II HW 3 out\n12 Review session: Preparation for Quiz 1 \nPart II: Quantum Mechanical Methods\n13 It\'s a quantum world: The theory of quantum mechanics \n14 Quantum mechanics (QM): Practice makes perfect \n15 From many-body to single-particle: Quantum modeling of molecules HW 4 out\n16 Application of quantum mechanics to solar thermal fuels \n17 More QM modeling for solar thermal fuels, plus a little H-storage \n18 From atoms to solids HW 4 due\nHW 5 out\n19 Quantum modeling of solids: Basic properties \n20 Advanced properties of materials: What else we can do? \n21 Some review and introduction to solar photovoltaics (PV) HW 5 due\nHW 6 out\n22 Quiz 2 \n23 Solar photovoltaics \n24 A bit more solar PV, some verification and validation and a few concluding thoughts HW 6 due\n\n
Course image Logic Circuit
School of Computer Science & IT
COURSE OUTLINE\nName: Logic Circuit\nCourse Code: PHY 2201 \nLECTURER: DrD. Elisephane IRANKUNDA\nOBJECTIVES:\nAt the end of this course, the student should be able to:\n\n• Understanding logic in circuit design\n• Design and implement combinational circuit \n• Implement practical working examples\nASSESSMENT:\n• Assignments 15%\n• Continuous Assessment 15%\n• Final Exam 70%\n• Total 100%\n\nREFERENCES:\n1. Fundamentals of Physics. 9th ed., David Halliday, Robert Resnick, Jearl Walker, John Wiley & Sons, 2010. ISBN: 9780470469118\n2. G. Boole, An Investigation of the Laws of Thought, 1854, reprinted by Dover Publications, New York, 1954\n3. E. V. Huntington, “Sets of Independent Postulates for the Algebra of Logic,”Transactions of the American Mathematical Society 5 (1904), pp. 288–309.\n4. Introduction to logic circuit, April 5, 1999 14:05 g02-ch2 Sheet number 1 Page number 17 black\n5. A. Dewey, Analysis and Design of Digital Systems with VHDL (PWS Publishing Co.Boston, 1997).\n\n\nWEEK TOPIC CONTENT\n1&2 Mathematical Elements of Logic • Propositional Logic \n• Negation of proposition\n• Implication \n• Disjunctions \n• Equivalence \n• Proposition conjunctions\n• The truth table\n• Normal Form Reduction\n• Propositional Formalization\n3,4,5&6 Logic Circuits • introduction to circuits elements, \n• Variables ( Consepts of switches) ,\n• parallel and series combinations of switches within electrical circuits and Functions (logical OR function and logical AND function) ,\n• Inversion, Truth Tables, transistors, \n• Logic Gates(the elements of logic circuits-AND,OR, NOT NOR,\n• Buffer, XOR,XNOR, and NAND gates and Networks),\n• Analysis of a Logic Network,\n• Timing Diagram, Functionally \n• Equivalent Networks,\n• Boolean Algebra and Axioms of Boolean Algebra, \n• Boolean Single-Variable Theorems,\n• Duality, Two- and Three-Variable Properties, \n• Mapping Boolean expressions to logic gates, \n• a binary full adder , full adder sum and carry out, \n• Mapping truth tale to logic gates,\n• Many possible mapping, optimal gates realization,\nCAT 1\n7 Introduction to Mathematical sets • all sub set of Real numbers, \n• intersections, union, difference of sets and definitions \n• Series of exercises ( solved problems)\n8,9, &10 The Venn Diagram Representation • Constant 1 and constant 0 Venn Diagram Representation, \n• AND and OR Venn Diagram logic function Representation, \n• Proof of: Boolean Algebra;\n• Axioms of Boolean Algebra; \n• Boolean Single-Variable Theorems; \n• Duality, Two- and Three-Variable Properties using Venn Diagram Representation, \n• Notation and Terminology, \n• logical sum and product and Precedence of Operations.\n11&12 Synthesis Using AND, OR, and NOT Gates • logical sum and product,\n• Sum-of-Products \n• Product-of-Sums Forms,\n• Multiplexer Circuit, Three-Way Light Control, \n• Introduction to CAD Tools.\nCAT 2\n13 CLASS ASSIGNMENTS (TERM PAPER)\n14 EXAMS\n\n\n
Course image Database Management Systems
School of Computer Science & IT
Happy New year.\nMy name is Oloo Jacob.\nI will be your Lecturer for this unit. \nIts a practical unit.\n\nKind regards.\n
Course image Internet Programming and Web Design
School of Computer Science & IT
Happy New year.\nMy name is Oloo Jacob.\nI will be your Lecturer for this unit. \nIts a practical unit.\n\nKind regards.\n
Course image Object Oriented programming I (C++)
School of Computer Science & IT
Happy New year.\nMy name is Oloo Jacob.\nI will be your Lecturer for this unit. \nIts a practical unit.\n\nKind regards.\n\n\n\n
Course image Application Programming
School of Computer Science & IT
The purpose is to provide students with an understanding of Visual Basic as an Applications programming language.
By the completion of course, students should be able to:
  • .Understand and use vb controls
  •  Understand and be able to use the visual basic IDE\
  • Understand vb syntax and semantics
  •  Develop forms applications

Course image Introduction to Computer Programming
School of Computer Science & IT
Name: Introduction to Computer Programming
Course Code: CIT 1102
Contact Hours: 45 Hrs.
Prerequisites: None
Course Purpose
The aim of this course is to introduce you to computer programming. Computer programming is the process of formulating the problems in such a way that they can be solved using computers. This involves formulating the solution to the problem in the form of a sequence of simple operations, called an algorithm. The aim of the course is to teach you how to develop algorithms to solve a range of different problems, which you will later translate into C++ Programs.
Learning Outcomes
By the end of this course, students will be able to:-
1. Outline and analyze the strategies and methods of problem solving.
2. Apply the methods of structured program design.
3. Compare the basic facilities of a program development environment
4. Infer programs using simple data types, basic control structures including sequencing, selection, iteration, and functions.
Course Content
Structured programming: problem solving techniques; Algorithms; Pseudo code; Syntax, and Semantics, and looping control constructs; Functional and procedural abstractions Data abstraction.
Learning and Teaching Methodology
Lectures, Tutorials and Practical lab sessions
Instructional materials/Equipment
Audi Visual equipment, chalkboard, computer simulation software , programming language tools

Assessment
Type Weighting
Examination 70%
Continuous Assessment 30%
Total 100%

Recommended Text Books
1. Programming and Problem Solving with C++, Nell Dale, Chip Weens and Mark Headington, Jones and Barlett Publishing 2002.ISBN 0-7637-0798-8
Course image Object Oriented Programming II (Java Programming)
School of Computer Science & IT
Names: Java Programming\nCourse code: CIT 2101\nContact Hours: 45 Hours\nCourse Purpose\nThis course emphasizes program construction, algorithm development, coding, debugging and documentation of console and graphical user applications. It further imparts in application of advanced object oriented techniques to application development using java. Course content emphasizes database connectivity, inner classes, collection classes, networking and threads\nLearning outcomes\n1. By the end of this course, students should be able to:\n2. Apply stand –alone applications using the java language.\n3. Accurately implement Object-Oriented concepts using java features, such as classes, interfaces, and references.\n4. Develop well-scoped classes using package and inner classes.\n5. Implement the java 2 Collections Framework to work with groups of objects, the java .awt and javax,swing packages to create GUI application\n6. Implement threads to improve performance of java programs\n\n\nCourse Content\nIntensive and hands- on, the course emphasizes becoming productive quickly as java application developer. This course quickly covers he java 5.0 language syntax and then moves into the object-oriented features of the language. Students will then use several of the provided API packages, such as I/O streams, collection, Swing GUI programming, threads and accessing a database with JDBC.The course ends with a chapter on performance tuning with hints and best practices for writing efficient applications. Appendices on sockets, regular expressions and J2EE are also available for further study.\nLearning and Teaching Methodology\nLectures, Tutorials and Lab Sessions\nAssessment\nType Weighting\nExamination 70%\nContinuous Assessment 30%\nTotal 100%\n\nRecommended Text Books\n1. Introduction to Programming in Java. Sedge wick and Wayne, Addison Wesley (20007), ISBN:978-0321498052.\n2. Java For Dummies, 4th Edition, Barry Burd (2006),ISBN:0470087161,978-470087169\n3. Sam’s Teach Yourself Programming with Java in 24 hours, 4th Edition, Rogers Cadenhead, Sams(2010),ISBN:0672328445,978-672328442\n4. Head First Java, 2nd Edition, Kathy Sierra and Bert Bates, O’Reilly Media, Inc. (2009). ISBN:0596009208,978-059600920
Course image Bachelors of Business Information Technology
School of Computer Science & IT

Our Bachelor of Business Information Technology program is your key to mastering the intersection of business and technology. With relevant courses and industry-savvy faculty, this program equips students with the skills needed for success in the dynamic world of IT and business. Join us for a journey into the heart of business technology innovation.

Course image Bachelors of Computer Science & Information Technology
School of Computer Science & IT

Our Bachelor of Computer Science & Information Technology program provides the gateway to a world of technological innovation. With cutting-edge courses and industry-experienced faculty, this program equips students with the skills and knowledge to excel in the digital age. Join us for a journey into the heart of computer science and IT expertise.

Course image Fundamentals of Computer Science and its Applications
School of Computer Science & IT

This course is designed to develop students’ computer literacy, keyboarding skills and to meet the needs of students in the associate degree programs and technical certificate programs. The student will learn from hands-on experiences basic skills in file management utilities, word processing, spreadsheets, and graphical presentations in the Windows environment.

Course image Business Management (BBM) Option - Human Resource
School of Computer Science & IT

Our Business Management (BBM) program offers a specialized track in Human Resource, empowering students with the knowledge and skills to excel in managing and nurturing talent within organizations. Join us to embark on a journey to become a human resource professional.

Course image Business Management (BBM) Option - Sales & Marketing
School of Computer Science & IT

Our Business Management (BBM) program offers a specialized track in Sales & Marketing, preparing students for dynamic and rewarding careers in the world of sales and marketing. Join us to become a future sales and marketing leader.

Course image Business Management (BBM) Options - Accounting, Banking, and Finance
School of Computer Science & IT

Our Business Management (BBM) program offers specialized tracks in Accounting, Banking, and Finance. These options provide students with focused knowledge and skills in these vital areas of business. Join us to chart your path to a successful career in finance and financial management.

Course image Fundamentals of Computer Science and its Applications
School of Computer Science & IT

This course is designed to develop students’ computer literacy, keyboarding skills and to meet the needs of students in the associate degree programs and technical certificate programs. The student will learn from hands-on experiences basic skills in file management utilities, word processing, spreadsheets, and graphical presentations in the Windows environment.

Course image Production and Operations Management
School of Education
Page No.\nUnit 1 Introduction to Production Management 7\nUnit 2 Production Planning and Control 14\nUnit 3 Project Management 25\nUnit 4 Supply Chain Management 49\nUnit 5 Inventory Management 61
Course image Principles of Marketing
School of Education
BASIC PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING AND MANAGEMENT\nLESSON 1- Definition & Core concept, marketing tools, P’s- product, price, place and\npromotion\nLESSON 2- Market segmentation, targeting and positioning & analyzing the marketing\nenvironment\nLESSON 3- Study consumer behavior, needs and motivation, group dynamics, social\nsurroundings and consumer perception\nLESSON 4-Promotion mix-direct selling, advertising, sales promotion and public\nrelations\nLESSON 5-Brand evaluation and new trends in marketing\nLESSON 6-Communication\nLESSON 7- Relationship marketing\nLESSON 8- Network and cyber marketing\nLESSON 9- E-commerce\nLESSON10- Rural marketing in India\nLESSON 11- Ethics and marketing\nLESSON 12- Introduction to management\nLESSON 13- Decision making and organization
Course image Introduction to Communication skills
School of Education
communication skills is very important for students since it gives the foundation for other units. it gives student to what communication is, process of communication and how to be good communicators in life
Course image Entrepreneurship Skills
School of Education
This unit gives the students the skills to spot business opportunities that they can use to create their on job
Course image Advertising and Promotion Management
School of Education
Advertising and promotion course outline \n\nTABLE OF CONTENTS\n\n\nTable Of Contents 2\nLesson 1 7\nIntroduction To Advertising Management 7\n1.0. Objectives 7\n1.1.Introduction 7\n1.2. Definition And Types Of Advertising 7\n1.4. Marketing And Advertising 11\n1.5 Importance And Role Of Advertising And Promotion 11\n1.6. Functions Of Advertising 12\n1.7. Other Promotion Tools 13\n1.8. Summarry 14\n1.9. Review Questions 15\nLesson 2 16\nAdvertising Planning Process 16\n2.0.Objectives 16\n2.1. Introduction 16\n2.2. Steps In The Planning Process 16\n2.3. Organizing The Advertising Department 18\n2.4 Role Of Advertising Manager 19\n2.4.Advertising Agencies 20\n2.6. Summarry 22\n2.8. Further Reading 22\nLesson 3 24\nAttitude And Market Structure 24\n3.0. Objectives 24\n3.1. Introduction 24\n3.2. Attitudes And Their Formation 24\n3.4. Information Processing And Attitude Change 26\n3.5. Market Structure 29\n3.6. Market Segmentation 30\n3.7. Choosing Target Segments 32\n3.8. Competetive Positioning 32\n3.9. The Advertising Communication Process 33\n3.11. Review Exercises 34\n3.12. Further Reading 35\nLesson 4 35\nAvdertising Objectives 36\n4.0. Objectives 36\n4.1. Introduction 36\n4.2. Definition Of Advertising Objectives 36\n4.3. Importance Of Objectives 36\n4.4. Types Of Objectives 37\n4.5. Characteristics Of Good Objectives 38\n4.6. Summary 39\n4.7. Review Questions 39\nLesson 5 41\nBudget Setting 41\n5.0. Objectives 41\n5.1. Introduction 41\n5.2. Budgeting Approaches 41\n5.3. Allocating The Budget 44\n5.4. Relationship Between Advertising And Sales 47\nLesson 6 49\nMessage Strategy 49\n6.0. Objectives 49\n6.1. Introduction 49\n6.2. Characteristics Of Successful Message 49\n6.3. Creative Strategy 49\n6.4. How To Design Advertisement (Print) 54\n6.5. Design Principles 55\n6.6. Creating Tv Commercial 56\n6.7. Radio Advertisements 58\n6.8. Review Questions 59\n6.9. Further Reading 60\nLesson 7 61\nMedia Decisions And Strategy 61\n7.0. Objectives 61\n7.1 Introduction 61\n7.2 Media Planning And Buying 61\n7.3 Media Strategy 62\n7.4 Choosing Among Major Media Types 63\n7.5 Advertising Media 66\n7.5.1 Television 66\n\n7.5.4 Magazines 70\n7.6 Summarry 76\n7.7 Review Questions 77\n7.8 Further Reading 78\nLesson 8 79\nAdvertising Research 79\n8.0. Objectives 79\n8.1. Introduction 79\n8.2. Definition And Types Of Advertising Research 79\n8.3. Evaluating Advertising Effectiveness 82\n8.4. Summarry 89\n8.5. Review Questions 89\n8.6. Further Reading 90\nLesson 9 91\nSocial And Economic Effects Of Advertising 91\n9.1 Objectives 91\n9.2 Introduction 91\n9.3 Social And Ethical Issues 91\n9.3. Economic Effects Of Advertising 94\n9.4. Summarry 95\n9.5. Review Questions 95\n9.6. Further Reading 96\nLesson 10 97\nPublic Relations And Publicity 97\n10.0. Objectives 97\n10.3. Publicity 102\n10.4. Corporate Advertising 103\n10.5. Summarry 104\n10.6. Review Questions 104\nLesson 11 106\nDirect Marketing 106\n11.0. Objectives 106\n11.1. Introduction 106\n11.2. Major Channels For Direct Marketing 106\n11.3. Benefits Of Direct Marketing 114\n11.4. Drawbacks To Direct Marketing 115\n11.5. Integrated Direct Marketing 115\n11.7. Review Questions 117
Course image E-Marketing and ICT Based Services
School of Education
Introduction 2\nGlossary 5\n1.The development of information and communication technologies and their impact on business. 8\n2.The information technology and telecommunications development and its impact on business 23\n3.Internet impact on traditional marketing, basic marketing concepts (I) 34\n4.Internet impact on traditional marketing, basic marketing concepts (II) 44\n5.Concept of e-marketing 57\n6.Online marketing objectives and functions 73\n7.Electronic Marketing Strategy 80\n8.E-marketing strategies 96\n9.Websites (I) 107\n10.Websites (II) 116\n11.Advertising and other means of communication on the Internet (I) 127\n12.Advertisement and other means of communication on the Internet (II) 154\n13.Pricing and placing channels on the Internet (I) 167\n14.Pricing and online dissemination channels (II) 174\n15.Evaluating the effectiveness of e-marketing mix 184\n16.Internet Marketing Plan 198\nResearch paper – abstract 213\nReferences 214\nSelf-evaluation Tests and Questions: Answer Key 218
Course image Sales Management and Negotiation
School of Education
SALES MANAGEMENT: AN OVERVIEW \nSTRUCTURE \n1.0 Objective \n1.1 Introduction \n1.2 Definition \n1.3 Benefits of selling activities \n1.4 Elements of sales management \n1.5 Objectives of sales management \n1.6 SMBO approach \n1.6.1 Process of SMBO \n1.6.2 Importance of SMBO \n1.7 Organisation of selling unit \n1.7.1 Need and Importance \n1.7.2 Functions of Sale Organisation \n1.7.3 Structure of Sales Organisation \n1.7.4 Steps to establish a sales structure \n1.8 Summary \n1.9 Keywords \n1.10 Self assessment questions \n1.11 References/suggested reading
Course image Human Health
School of Education
INTRODUCTION\nHED 205 is a two (2) unit course with four (4) modules and fifteen (15) units. Human\nHealth Protection is a course in the field of Human Health Education that emphasizes the\nneed for communityparticipation in protecting the Human Health of individuals and that of\nthe community. The course is aimed at introducing students to identify how different\nstakeholders and factors can influence Human Health. It also helps students see the need to\nbuild capacity in people, instilling confidence in them to take control of their own Human\nHealth. WHAT YOU WILL LEARN IN THIS COURSE\nIn this course, there are course units and a course guide. The course guide shows what the\ncourse is all about. The course guide contains the general overview of the course material you\nwill be using and how to use the material. It also helps you to allocate the appropriate time to\neach unit so that you can successfully complete the course within the stipulated time limit. The\ncourse guide also prepares your mind as students on how to go about Tutor-Marked\nAssignments which will form part of the overall assessment at the end of this course. Moreover, there will be regular tutorial classes that are related to this course, where you can interact with\nyour facilitator and other students. You are encouraged to be on the lookout for this tutorial\nand plan to make the most of them. THE COURSE\nThis course is carefully designed to help appreciate the concepts of Human Health education, promotionand protection and how they are related. It also highlights Human Health education\ntheories and how they can be used to drive behavioural changes that will promote Human\nHealth. Current trends in the public Human Health practices and the relationship with other\nallied Human Health professionals, teacher, social workers among others. COURSE AIM\nThe course aims to give you an understanding of how use Human Health promotion and\nprotection strategies to prevent disease outbreak as well as heal people improve their Human\nHealth.\n4\nCOURSE OBJECTIVES\nTo achieve the aim set above, there are objectives. Each unit has a set of objectives presented\nat the beginning of the unit. These objectives are stated to give you what to concentrate / focus\non while studying the unit. Please read the objective (s) before studying the unit and during\nyour study to check your progress. The comprehensive objectives of the Course are given below. By the end of the course, you\nshould be able to:\ni. The concept of Human Health education\nii. Historical perspectives and basis of Human Health education programme\niii. The concept of Human Health promotion\niv. Importance of “behaviour change” theories for Human Health education\nv. How Human Health education system can be used to resolve Human Health issues\nvi. How nutritionists and other allied Human Health professions\nvii. How Human Health protection is dependent on individual lifestyles\nviii. Various strategies of protecting and promoting Human Health at the community levels\nix. How work place can be an important site of carrying out Human Health\npromotion andprotection at the community levels\nx. Importance of personal and environmental hygiene\nWORKING THROUGH THIS COURSE\nTo successfully complete this course, you have to carefully read all the study units, as well as\nthe textbooks and other materials provided by the National Open University of Nigeria. Reading the referenced materials can also be of great assistance. There are self-assessment\nexercises in each of the units that are important for you to try your hands on ; at different times, you may be required to submit your assignments for assessment. There will be a final\nexamination at the end of the course. The course should take you about 15 weeks to complete. This course guide will provide you with all the components of the course and how to go about\nstudying. It is important for you to allocate your time discretely and ensure that all the units\nare covered within the time frame and successfully. THE COURSE MATERIAL\nThe main components of the course are: • The Study Guide\n• Study Units\n• Reference / Further Reading\n• Assignments\n• Presentation Schedule.\n5\nTHE STUDY UNIT\nModule 1: Overview of Human Health Education and its Various Perspectives\nUnit 1: Concept of Human Health education\nUnit 2: Historical view of Human Health education\nUnit 3: Various perspectives of Human Health education\nUnit 4: Current national Human Health issues in Human\nHealth education Module 2: Agents of Human Health\nProtection and Promotion Unit 1: Teachers as agents of\nHuman Health protection and promotion\nUnit 2: Nutritionists as agents of Human Health protection and promotion\nUnit 3: Selected Human Health professionals as agents of Human Health\nprotection and promotionModule 3: Approaches to the Protection and\nPromotion of Human Human Health Unit 1: Protection and promotion of\nhuman Human Health at Individual level\nUnit 2: Protection and promotion of human Human Health at\ncommunity levelUnit 3: Protection and promotion through food\nUnit 4: Protection and promotion through drug control\nUnit 5: Protection and promotion through personal hygiene\nModule 4: Essential Services in Human Health Protection and Promotion\nUnit 1: Water supplies in Human Health protection and\npromotionUnit 2: Waste disposal in Human Health protection\nand promotion\nUnit 3: Role of government and Human Health agencies in Human Health protection and promotion\nASSIGNMENT FILE\nWe have two assessments types in this course. First are the Tutor Marked Assignments\n(TMAs); second is the written examination. In answering questions in the assignments, it is\nimportant for you to display appreciable knowledge of the subject matter as well as experience\nacquired during the course. Ensure that you always promptly submit all the assignments to your\ncourse facilitator for formal assessment by the hand-in dates stated in the assignment file. These\n6\nassignment will contribute to your continuous assessment and may account for 30 percent of\nyour total course mark. You will be required to sit for a final examination of 2 hours duration\nat your study centre at the end of this course. This final examination will account for 70 % of\nyour total course mark
Course image Industrial Marketing
School of Education
INTRODUCTION\nHED 205 is a two (2) unit course with four (4) modules and fifteen (15) units. Human\nHealth Protection is a course in the field of Human Health Education that emphasizes the\nneed for communityparticipation in protecting the Human Health of individuals and that of\nthe community. The course is aimed at introducing students to identify how different\nstakeholders and factors can influence Human Health. It also helps students see the need to\nbuild capacity in people, instilling confidence in them to take control of their own Human\nHealth. WHAT YOU WILL LEARN IN THIS COURSE\nIn this course, there are course units and a course guide. The course guide shows what the\ncourse is all about. The course guide contains the general overview of the course material you\nwill be using and how to use the material. It also helps you to allocate the appropriate time to\neach unit so that you can successfully complete the course within the stipulated time limit. The\ncourse guide also prepares your mind as students on how to go about Tutor-Marked\nAssignments which will form part of the overall assessment at the end of this course. Moreover, there will be regular tutorial classes that are related to this course, where you can interact with\nyour facilitator and other students. You are encouraged to be on the lookout for this tutorial\nand plan to make the most of them. THE COURSE\nThis course is carefully designed to help appreciate the concepts of Human Health education, promotionand protection and how they are related. It also highlights Human Health education\ntheories and how they can be used to drive behavioural changes that will promote Human\nHealth. Current trends in the public Human Health practices and the relationship with other\nallied Human Health professionals, teacher, social workers among others. COURSE AIM\nThe course aims to give you an understanding of how use Human Health promotion and\nprotection strategies to prevent disease outbreak as well as heal people improve their Human\nHealth.\n4\nCOURSE OBJECTIVES\nTo achieve the aim set above, there are objectives. Each unit has a set of objectives presented\nat the beginning of the unit. These objectives are stated to give you what to concentrate / focus\non while studying the unit. Please read the objective (s) before studying the unit and during\nyour study to check your progress. The comprehensive objectives of the Course are given below. By the end of the course, you\nshould be able to:\ni. The concept of Human Health education\nii. Historical perspectives and basis of Human Health education programme\niii. The concept of Human Health promotion\niv. Importance of “behaviour change” theories for Human Health education\nv. How Human Health education system can be used to resolve Human Health issues\nvi. How nutritionists and other allied Human Health professions\nvii. How Human Health protection is dependent on individual lifestyles\nviii. Various strategies of protecting and promoting Human Health at the community levels\nix. How work place can be an important site of carrying out Human Health\npromotion andprotection at the community levels\nx. Importance of personal and environmental hygiene\nWORKING THROUGH THIS COURSE\nTo successfully complete this course, you have to carefully read all the study units, as well as\nthe textbooks and other materials provided by the National Open University of Nigeria. Reading the referenced materials can also be of great assistance. There are self-assessment\nexercises in each of the units that are important for you to try your hands on ; at different times, you may be required to submit your assignments for assessment. There will be a final\nexamination at the end of the course. The course should take you about 15 weeks to complete. This course guide will provide you with all the components of the course and how to go about\nstudying. It is important for you to allocate your time discretely and ensure that all the units\nare covered within the time frame and successfully. THE COURSE MATERIAL\nThe main components of the course are: • The Study Guide\n• Study Units\n• Reference / Further Reading\n• Assignments\n• Presentation Schedule.\n5\nTHE STUDY UNIT\nModule 1: Overview of Human Health Education and its Various Perspectives\nUnit 1: Concept of Human Health education\nUnit 2: Historical view of Human Health education\nUnit 3: Various perspectives of Human Health education\nUnit 4: Current national Human Health issues in Human\nHealth education Module 2: Agents of Human Health\nProtection and Promotion Unit 1: Teachers as agents of\nHuman Health protection and promotion\nUnit 2: Nutritionists as agents of Human Health protection and promotion\nUnit 3: Selected Human Health professionals as agents of Human Health\nprotection and promotionModule 3: Approaches to the Protection and\nPromotion of Human Human Health Unit 1: Protection and promotion of\nhuman Human Health at Individual level\nUnit 2: Protection and promotion of human Human Health at\ncommunity levelUnit 3: Protection and promotion through food\nUnit 4: Protection and promotion through drug control\nUnit 5: Protection and promotion through personal hygiene\nModule 4: Essential Services in Human Health Protection and Promotion\nUnit 1: Water supplies in Human Health protection and\npromotionUnit 2: Waste disposal in Human Health protection\nand promotion\nUnit 3: Role of government and Human Health agencies in Human Health protection and promotion\nASSIGNMENT FILE\nWe have two assessments types in this course. First are the Tutor Marked Assignments\n(TMAs); second is the written examination. In answering questions in the assignments, it is\nimportant for you to display appreciable knowledge of the subject matter as well as experience\nacquired during the course. Ensure that you always promptly submit all the assignments to your\ncourse facilitator for formal assessment by the hand-in dates stated in the assignment file. These\n6\nassignment will contribute to your continuous assessment and may account for 30 percent of\nyour total course mark. You will be required to sit for a final examination of 2 hours duration\nat your study centre at the end of this course. This final examination will account for 70 % of\nyour total course mark